ALIVE WITH HISTORY

2000 Years in one amazing visit
© Ancient House Museum, Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service

Tudors and Jacobeans

Thetford became the haunts of Kings, Queens and Dukes.

The Tudor and Jacobean period saw the town develop further, thanks to friendships with the Dukes of Norfolk, the Cleres, the Fulmerstons and James I.

Overview

The Dissolution affected many aspects of life in Thetford, religious life, economy and trade and the landscape of the town were substantially altered by the loss of the monastic houses which had so characterised the medieval period. The town was incorporated in the late 16th century, which shaped the way that Thetford was governed for the rest of the post medieval period. In addition, Thetford also enjoyed close connections with nobility and royalty during this period, particularly the visit of Elizabeth I in 1578.

People

The dissolution of the monasteries in the 1530s and 1540s had a profound impact on Thetford; then a small rural town with a high proportion of religious houses. In 1539 the Mayor and burgesses complained to Thomas Cromwell that the town had been partly dependant on the number of pilgrims passing through the town, and that since the monastic houses had ceased to function a number of the town’s inhabitants were in danger of being brought into ‘extreme beggary’. Two people benefitted in particular from the Dissolution; Thomas Howard, the third Duke of Norfolk and Sir Richard Fulmerston.
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Places

© Ancient House Museum, Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service
© Ancient House Museum, Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service
Key dates
  • 1529
  • 1536
  • 1536
  • 1537
  • 1540
  • 1549
  • 1555
  • 1574
  • 1578
  • 1603
© Ancient House Museum, Norfolk Museums and Archaeology Service